What word formation is involved in BATified, Atikulated and Obi-dient?

Akeem Lasisi

Politics has its own register that keeps evolving as the field itself. As eras, governments, policies and personalities change, new terms emerge, boosting macro or micro vocabularies.

In the case of Nigeria, our political history has yielded various peculiar terms that have somehow become part of ‘our’ English usages. Such include penkelemeesi, June 12, five fingers of a leprous hand, option A4, home-grown democracy, I dey kampe, stomach infrastructure and even one of the latest, vote and cook (Dibo ko se’be ) – meaning vote and get the cash that will guarantee you a pot of soup. You know if you say ‘June 12’ in Nigeria today, it does not refer to just the 12th day of the sixth month; it evokes June 12, 1993 and all the political history the day represents.

Around three of the presidential candidates in the current dispensation, three words have similarly evolved. These are BATified, Atikulated and Obi-dient. You will not find the words in any dictionary yet, but the fact is that they have entered the consciousness of many Nigerians. With all usually used adjectivally, the first hails from the camp of the All Progressives Congress’ candidate, Asiwaju Bola Tinubu, suggesting having bought into the Bola Ahmed Tinubu’s (BAT’s) philosophy and movement – BATified. The second, which is older than BATified, because the subject involved – Peoples Democratic Party’s Alhaji Atiku Abubakar – has been in the race longer than Tinubu, also means enamoured by the Atiku philosophy and candidature.

READ ALSO:  Nigerian soldier filmed assaulting female corps member

The third (Obi-dient), referring to Labour Party’s candidate, Peter Obi, indicates being compliant with the Peter Obi’s aspiration and ideals. As arbitrary as the process of generating the words may be, it has a place in English Language.  While this  is not to say that you should begin to use the codes indiscriminately especially in formal writings, in vocabulary, grammar and literature, the three words pass the test of scholarship.

Blending

First, BATtified, Atikulated and Obi-dient are examples of blends because they are a product of blending – the word formation process where parts of two or more words are combined to form a new one.

Common examples of blending are camcorder (camera + recorder), sitcom (situation + comedy), motel (motor+ hotel) and biopic (biography+ picture). Another popular one is brunch (breakfast+ lunch), meaning a meal you have in-between both.

In the same vein, ‘Atikulated’ is formed from Atiku and articulated; ‘Obi-dient’ is from Obi and obedient but it harbours a little intrigue.  The whole of ‘Obi’, not a part of it, is exploited. And when you combine a whole word with another, what you have is compounding (as we have  in headmaster, classroom, blackboard etc.). What this suggests is that ‘Obi-dient is a hybrid of blending and compounding. But you should not bother yourself too much about this because blending and compounding interrelate, with some experts describing the first as a form of the latter.

READ ALSO:  Reno Omokri says DSTV deliberately assigned channel 419 to DSTV

Interestingly, the Tinubu’s term is also a bit tricky in the sense that it is not too easy to determine the second word cut to realise the BATified. Yes, it is clear that BAT is the acronym for Bola Ahmed Tinubu. But what is the beginning of -tified originally? Satisfied or ratified? Anyway, one can risk concluding that BATified is from Bola Ahmed Tinubu and satisfied.

Another term for the process involved in the formation of the three words is coinage – the act of creating a new word or phrase which others begin to use.

The newly formed word is also called a coinage. Lastly, in literature, Obi-dient, Atikulated and BATified harbour the figure of speech called pun: a joke resulting from a play on words.

News Source


Tech Solutions with THE DGIT:

Build Your Websites and Mobile Apps

READ ALSO:  Serie A: Super Eagles star Victor Osimhen returns for Napoli
%d bloggers like this: