It is even more appalling that at the contemplation of any contrasting opinion to what the group, which see itself as constituting the true/real Igbos, considers as being correct, its self-reighteous members begin to curse at the contrarians and make them out as the efulefu – traitors/the ones without identity/the lost, and the many other ways in which the word is interpreted.

Anyi g’egbu ozu anyi g’eso kwa? Will we join in the killing of corpses whose funerals we will be a part of? Ponder! Ponder again! This land we built on blood, sweat, tears, and pain; this land we know how long it took to rebuild, to get to where we are; to become the envy of our neighbours; to become the reason why Nigeria’s economy keeps growing. Are we not the businessmen and women of this nation – the importers-exporters, like we are fondly called?

It is Ndi Igbo that our brothers and sisters from other ethnic nationalities within and even outside Nigeria look out for before inhabiting any geographic location. They would say, any place you go to and do not see an Igbo person, know that place is inhabitable; we give life a reason; we give people a reason to co-exist and live.

We do have legitimate concerns; yes, we do. Are we going about getting the attention we deserve in the right way? That is a big question we individually need to answer honestly.

For me, it is not a question of fighting for what we deserve but how we fight for this. Ndi Igbo si na nkwucha aburo ujo: That we as a people decide to be calm in the way we pursue our demands, does not qualify us as weak. Remember that he who fights and retreats, lives to fight another day. If we had all died between 1967 and 1970, will there still be grievances to settle?

After the killings and bloodshed in the South-East, will we all sit together to mourn and bury our dead, or do we plan to eat their corpses? Is this totally unavoidable?

These killings transcend the loss of lives, it also involves the loss of sources of income, wealth, education, and other losses that have become as a result of all the not properly thought out approaches to airing our grievances as a people.

We are losing money; Ndi Igbo are losing investments. What investor would bring their money, ideas, and infrastructure to an unstable location? The South-East is fast becoming an unstable location; we should #SaveSouthEastNow.

The news about school children being chased away from schools, forcing them to adhere to the sit-at-home protests, which are expected to affect those in the seat of power in Abuja, which is hundreds of kilometres away from the South-East is quite disturbing. Are we fighting against the education of our people or demanding for better for their future?

It is even more appalling that at the contemplation of any contrasting opinion to what the group, which see itself as constituting the true/real Igbos, considers as being correct, its self-reighteous members begin to curse at the contrarians and make them out as the efulefu – traitors/the ones without identity/the lost, and the many other ways in which the word is interpreted. In the worst case scenario, anoyone with a contrary view becomes a target, who probably needs to have a casket waiting for him or her.

Ezigbote Ada Igbo kam bu! Our demands for better from Nigeria are definitely not baseless but is killing ourselves the only way to approach the necessary resolution? Poor Dora Akunyili will be turning in agony in her grave, seeing what has been done to her spouse in her home State. Is home no longer where we feel safe?

News has it that Chike Akunyili was murdered gruesomely by unknown gunmen; when did our land become home to unknown gunmen? We have given way to unscrupulous elements to infiltrate our safe heaven and turn it into a den of vampires.

There are many others whose deaths may never make the news but they are humans and deserve to live as much as we do.

The news about school children being chased away from schools, forcing them to adhere to the sit-at-home protests, which are expected to affect those in the seat of power in Abuja, which is hundreds of kilometres away from the South-East is quite disturbing. Are we fighting against the education of our people or demanding for better for their future?

Why do we have to force others to believe in our cause, instead of convincing and giving them reasons to be on our side? Pray tell, what differentiates us from the bad leadership we claim to be fighting? Another question we must honestly answer.

We need good, proven, and trusted leadership at the National Assembly, the gathering where decisions binding on us are made. We constantly cheer Abaribe but does he have two heads? Is he the last of his kind? We often cheer him for being outspoken against ills; have we all lost our tongues?

In my opinion, the change we seek can only be achieved through active political participation, yet we choose to boycott elections and promote political apathy amongst our people. By not voting out bad leadership, we keep them in power.

We need good, proven, and trusted leadership at the National Assembly, the gathering where decisions binding on us are made. We constantly cheer Abaribe but does he have two heads? Is he the last of his kind? We often cheer him for being outspoken against ills; have we all lost our tongues? The cat cut them, I am told. We would rather sit in circles and cook up ways of destroying our land. Ndi Igbo, we must #SaveSouthEastNow.

With the little history I know, never have I read that boycotting an election gave power to the ‘right’ people. Our power is in the number of votes we cast.

I had earlier felt that it was necessary to call out the leaders of the South-East to intervene and save the situation. It was a subtle way of saying adighi agwa ochi nti na agha esu (a deaf person cannot be told that war has started/or war is near); apparently, this appeal was ignored.

Now agha esugo (war has started), we have all run into hiding to save our heads as though the heads of people rolling all over the South-East are not human heads.

In consideration of the sit at home of declared in the South-East today, October 1, it is important to assess the outcome of the previous sit at homes of the past months.

Again, Ozoemena!

Favour Okafor wrote from Awka, in the heart of the South-East.

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